Hardware Hacks for the LS Pro

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Revision as of 13:52, 20 February 2007 by 24.73.25.229 (Talk)

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All input is welcome. Please do not edit this page directly as I do not want any information to get past me without my knowledge as it could be detrimental to the LS Pro on which I'm experimenting. Please post any comments to the forum thread or the talk page.


Kurobrick.png
WARNING!

There is a possibility that you could brick your NAS with these instructions. Please make sure that you read the entire page carefully. THIS PAGE IS A WORK IN PROGRESS AND IS EXPERIMENTAL IN NATURE. AS SUCH, IS NOT FULLY TESTED AND IMPLEMENTED. THESE MODIFICATIONS MAY CAUSE DAMAGE TO THE LS Pro HARDWARE. IMPLEMENTING THE CHANGES DESCRIBED HERE MAY DAMAGE YOUR LS Pro BEYOND REPAIR, EVEN WITH JTAG ACCESS.



This is an account of the attempts of Tampakuro (aka Kuroguy) to open the LS Pro hardware to more development. I'll be concentrating mainly on the flash memory as well as adding an eSATA port.

Contents

Flash modifications

There are two obvious routes to reprogramming the flash memory:

The Dual flash Method

The JTAG Access Method

Adding an additional hard drive

Adding a second SATA drive to your Linkstation Pro is as simple as installing a 0.01 uF surface mount capacitor at C279, C280, C281, and C282 and then installing the proper Molex connector at CN8. I used a Molex part number xxxxx and held it down with a piece of 18 gage wire soldered over it like a strap. I've atached a photo:


CN8.jpg


To test this I plugged the hard disk into the new sata port (I didn't have a spare SATA drive). The bootloader would not boot directly to the SATA drive plugged into CN8 so I bbooted the device using TFTP to retrieve the kernel and initrd. Once the device had the kernel and initrd loaded it pivoted to the root filesystem on the SATA drive even though it was attached to the secondary SATA port. I have attached a portion og the DMESG showing the device was recognized:

  ...o Checksum offload enabled
  o Loading network interface ** egiga_init_module (0)
'eth0' 
Intergrated Sata device found
scsi0 : Marvell SCSI to SATA adapter
scsi1 : Marvell SCSI to SATA adapter
  Vendor: WDC       Model: WD2500JS-00NCB1   Rev: 10.0
  Type:   Direct-Access                      ANSI SCSI revision: 03
SCSI device sda: 488397168 512-byte hdwr sectors (250059 MB)
SCSI device sda: drive cache: write back
SCSI device sda: 488397168 512-byte hdwr sectors (250059 MB)
SCSI device sda: drive cache: write back
 sda: sda1 sda2 sda3 sda4
Attached scsi disk sda at scsi0, channel 0, id 0, lun 0
Attached scsi generic sg0 at scsi0, channel 0, id 0, lun 0,  type 0
physmap flash device: 400000 at ff800000
CFI: Found no phys_mapped_flash device at location zero....

The next step after installing the SATA connector is to place the board back into the metal chassis and mark the location of the new opening that must be cut to allow access to the connector from the outside of the case. A dremel tool works well for cutting the chassis. After cutting the hole into the chassis, place the chassis into the plastic case and use a hot pin to mark the corners of the opening in the plastic case. Heat the pin sufficiently to poke completely through the case and then use a hot blade to connect the dots you just made in the case. I've found that a razor knife's blade heated with a torch will cleanly cut through the plastic case.